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A Guide To Bathing Your Disabled Pet

Most dogs and parents dread it, but it’s something that has to be done. We’re talking about giving our dogs a bath. It’s a very important routine, more so for disabled dogs than regularly mobile dogs because of the challenges the former faces on a daily basis. Giving them regular baths is not only good for their hygiene but also for their overall health and comfort. Here are some tips on how we can give our best friend a proper cleaning.

 

Make a Regular Schedule

For most dogs, regular bathing is usually once a month. For disabled dogs, it usually has to be more frequent, at least twice a month or even more. This is because disabled dogs get their coats and skin dirty faster. Most of them have partial or no control of their limbs. Many drag a part of their body, typically the hind legs, and doing so gets this area more prone to dirt. Also, because of their limited mobility, they often get dirty from their own pee or poop. In many cases, disabled dogs don’t even realize that they are wallowing in their own dirt. In some cases, dog owners are also unaware that their disabled pets soaked in their pee, especially when it has already dried off.

Add to that the unavoidable small accidents that occur due to a pet’s disability such as spills and falls.

 

How Often is Regular

You need to bathe your dog regularly. How often is regular? It greatly depends on your dog’s lifestyle. For example, if your dog likes to roam around all the time and gets their fur dirty often, then twice a month is not enough. Regularly check the condition of our dog’s skin and fur to find out how fast they get dirty after each bathing session in order to find the right interval.

 

In Case of Emergency

When you do find the right schedule, it does not mean you have to stick to it faithfully, especially if your dog gets into an accident. If our dog gets dirty is an isolated area, it may not be necessary to give them a full bath. In such cases, you can simply clean them off with baby wipes or a wet towel. For major pee and poop soiling, though, a full bath may be necessary.

 

The Right Shampoo

Because they need more frequent baths, the skin of your dog may be prone to problems such as dryness or rashes. This is why it’s important to find a product suited to your pet. Unless specifically instructed by your veterinarian, never use shampoos for humans to bathe your dog. In most cases, a no-tears shampoo is good for using on your dog’s head and face and a moisturizing dog shampoo for the entire body. Consult your vet before choosing a shampoo for your dog.

 

Water Temperature

When giving your dog a bath, the temperature of the water is also an important factor to keep them calm and comfortable. Too cold or too hot and it could upset them and cause them to associate bath time with discomfort. On the other hand, many disabled dogs also have partial or full loss of nerve function so they may not be able to tell if the water is too hot or too cold, which may also cause skin problems. As a rule of thumb, use warm or tepid water for your dog’s bath.

 

Positioning Them for the Bath

Bath position may seem like a weird concern, but remember you are bathing a disabled dog. Most of them are unable to place themselves in a comfortable position during the process. There is the possibility of getting their nose, eyes and ears wet, which may cause more discomfort or even drowning. The aim is to position your dog so that they are comfortable and ensure that their head is high enough to avoid accidentally dipping their nose, eyes, and ears in the water. If your dog cannot sit up at all, put it on its side and elevate the head using a waterproof non-slip pillow to keep it above the water. Check that your dog’s legs are straight and in a comfortable position, and the tail can move freely.

Check the surface you bathe your pet on. Avoid anything that might cause an accidental slip or slide, that’ll make the bathing process harder than it needs to be.

Pick a tub that’s big enough to ensure the comfort of your dog. A non-slip mat goes a long way to keeping everyone safe. Depending on you dog’s size, bath time can be done in your own bath tub, in the sink, or a small wash tub or basin. Again, make sure to place your dog so that its head is higher than the rest of its body.

 

Giving Your Dog a Bath

When all is set, begin by getting your dog wet from the head to paws. If you are using a hose, make sure the water pressure is gentle enough to avoid hurting your dog. You should also direct the spray in an oblique angle to lessen the pressure.

Avoid getting the nose, eyes and ear holes wet. After getting your dog’s entire body wet, start shampooing the head with a no-tears shampoo. Start on the face, behind the ears and head, avoiding the nose, ear holes and eyes. Rub and massage in the shampoo following the direction of the fur coat. Shampoo the rest of the body with the same motion using the moisturizing dog shampoo.

Rinse with water starting from the head to the limbs, again avoiding the nose, eyes and ear holes. Make sure to rinse off all the shampoo by rinsing twice. After rinsing, place your dog in a comfortable position on a thick dry towel and gently rub dry.

Now you have a clean dry happy dog!

 

 

This article was published on Wednesday 16 May, 2018.
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